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Children aged 18 and younger may be eligible to receive Supplemental Security Income benefits


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Children under the age of 18 may be eligible to receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits dependent upon their household income and severity of their disability. Like adults, children must qualify technically and medically in order to be eligible to receive SSI benefits.

Technical Requirements


The Social Security Administration (SSA) uses a “deeming” process to determine if a child under the age of 18 is technically (non-medically) eligible to receive SSI. Deeming is Social Security’s way of assuming a child shares a part of their parents’ income. Parents’ earned and unearned income, as well as assets and resources, can affect a child’s SSI eligibility.

The number of parents, number of children, and how much each parent is earning will all affect a child’s SSI eligibility. For more information regarding your specific situation, call us now.

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Medical Requirements


Once a child is technically approved to receive SSI benefits, they must also meet the medical requirements. Just like adults, children have to meet the definition of being disabled under Social Security’s rules. Two aspects are required:

• The child must have a physical or mental condition(s) that very seriously limits his or her activities; and
• The condition(s) must have lasted, or be expected to last, at least 1 year or result in death.

The severity of the physical or mental condition(s) is determined through medical records and Disability Determination Services (DDS). If the condition(s) will not last at least 1 year, the child will not be entitled to receive SSI benefits.

We have helped families receive SSI benefits for their children since 1993. Contact us now so we can get started with yours!

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